Tight Race in Michigan

January 15, 2008 12:00:00 AM PST
The leading Republican presidential contenders swarmed the state of Michigan today. It's a tight race as voters head to the polls tomorrow.The latest ABC News poll finds john McCain leading with 28-percent, Mike Huckabee is second with 20% percent and Mitt Romney comes in third with 19-percent.

The economy tops the list of issues most important with voters.

After second place finishes in both Iowa and New Hampshire, Mitt Romney is going for the gold in Tuesday's Republican Primary in Michigan, a state where it is no secret what's on the mind of voters.

"Over the last 40 years, a lot has changed. Michigan isn't what it was economically", said Romney.

In fact, 300,000 jobs have been lost in that state since the year 2000. Romney, who was born and raised in Michigan, disagrees with the claim of rival John McCain that some of those jobs are gone for good.

Romney said, "I want to bring Michigan back. I'm not willing to sit back and say too bad for Michigan too bad for the car industry, too bad for the people who've lost their jobs; they're gone forever. That's not the kind of pessimism I think that'll make Michigan strong again."

At a town hall meeting in Kalamazoo, McCain emphasized the need for re-training the workforce and green technologies.

McCain said, "We have the innovation the talent, the knowledge and the ability in Detroit, Michigan and in this state to regain Michigan's position as the best in the world. We will create new jobs."

Socially conservative Western Michigan is where Mike Huckabee has his sights set. Today, he took direct aim at Mitt Romney, son of former Governor George Romney.

"For those of us for whom summer is not a verb, for those of us who didn't go to fancy boarding schools on the east coast, for those of us who didn't grow up with a silver spoon, who were lucky to have a spoon//ask those folks and they'll tell you the economy is not doing well for them" said Huckabee.

According to the ABC News/Washington Post poll, 29% percent of those asked now call that economy the most important issue in their vote. That's nearly triple what it was just last September.


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