Measure E

May 27, 2008 9:11:50 PM PDT
Central Unified school district officials hope voters will think of the children and not their property taxes when they head to the polls next week.Central High West campus was built almost ninety years ago and it shows. "The travel areas are beaten down, the restrooms are very busy, the cafeteria is very busy," said assistant superintendent Mike Berg. "In fact, we have multiple lunch hours to accommodate the number of students."

The school is now a mismatch of permanent buildings and portables, many in obvious need of improvement and repair.

"We have block buildings, we have metal buildings, we have portables, so there is no particular style to the building where there once was."

Measure E would help change that. The bond would bring 152 million dollars to the district with an additional 80 million in matching state funds.

The district, which grew by 800 students just last year, would use the money to build a new high school, a new middle school and two new elementary schools ...It would also refurbish several of the districts older schools.

15-million dollars would go to Central High West. Berg said, "This campus has 16-hundred students, it was designed for 1000. So we are going to do some significant renovation in terms of landscape, restrooms, admin facility, cafeteria ... those kinds of things, to make sure they have adequate space."

In all, Measure E will fund over 100 projects district-wide.

It would cost property owners a maximum of $60 dollars annually, per $100-thousand dollars of assessed value ... So a home that's worth 200-thousand dollars, would pay a maximum of $120 a year.

Homeowner David Gonzales sees it as a win-win situation, "Although the housing economy is down right now, eventually improved schools are going to bring our housing prices up, so that is another benefit."

Measure "E" will require 55% voter approval to pass.


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