American parents frustrated by adoption ban

December 28, 2012 12:00:00 AM PST
Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a bill banning Americans from adopting Russian children.

Russian adoptions have always been difficult for Americans, but the ban has left several American parents in a terrible bind. Those who have already met their children and were about to bring them home are now frustrated and sad.

The sudden end to Russian adoptions hits home for Laurel Boylan. From her home in Clovis she heads a group called "God's Waiting Children." a volunteer organization which helps families all over the country get through the adoption process. She's upset over the adoption cut off imposed by Russian President Vladimir Putin.

"I'm livid, I just cannot believe that a president would take out his anger and aggressions on orphans," Boylan said.

Boylan is currently working with a New Jersey couple who had gone through the whole process and were just one week away from bringing home a little Russian boy named Sergei. They spoke with Action News in a Skype call from Laurel's office and said they were devastated to learn they may not be able to adopt him.

"We felt like he was part of our family already we spent time bonding with him in Russia. And by the end we were laughing with him, he was hugging us, we signed the paperwork," Rayna Eyerman said.

The Eyermans are just one of 43 U.S. families who were in the process of adopting a Russian child.

Thousands of Russian children have been adopted by American families. Back in 2004 a whole groups of Russian orphans was brought to the Central Valley by a church group, for adoption. But even before President Putin's crackdown the process had become more difficult, as Russians saw sending their children to America as a blow to their national pride.

While the ban imposed by Putin appears to be purely political, there has been concern in Russia over reports that a small number of Russian children have been abused, and even murdered by their adoptive American parents.

The State Department is working to try and convince the Russian government to rethink its position and allow those nearly completed adoptions to go through.


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