Selma High Ag teacher selected Fresno County's Teacher of the Year

Several Valley schools celebrated the success of their teachers and administrators after the Fresno County Office of Education held its annual Educator of the Year Awards.
October 25, 2013 3:27:52 PM PDT
Several Valley schools celebrated the success of their teachers and administrators after the Fresno County Office of Education held its annual Educator of the Year Awards. The event was held Thursday night at the Saroyan Theater.

This year a Selma Unified High School Ag teacher took home the top prize. When Roy Swift was selected as Fresno County's Educator of the Year he said he was in total shock.

"It's still sinking in. it's a pretty fantastic thing," Swift said.

Swifts students say he spent the last 25 years building the vet, science and Ag mechanics programs at Selma High School.

"He's really dedicated to his work and he doesn't always teach us in the book," vet science student Hannah Wood said.

Swift provides students with a hands-on experience on Selma High Schools 14 acre campus farm. Students learn how to raise sheep, hogs and emus. The program also teaches students to how grow citrus, vines and household plants.

Student Noah Say said Swift helped him finish a student project that ended up taking home the People's Choice Award at this year's Big Fresno Fair.

"I never thought I'd be working on a big 18-foot trailer this year," Say said. "I learned the dedication to that and all the hard work you have to put into it and it's okay to make mistakes, because that's the best way to learn is from mistakes."

Swift, who runs the Selma High School Agriculture Department, was also recognized for helping his students find their passion in life.

"He and my other Ag teachers inspired me to be an Ag teacher when I grow up and they really helped me because it seems like they're having so much fun," vet science student Crystal Farmer said.

Swift said he has been at Selma High School so long that some of his previous students now have students of their own in his classes. Many of his past students are now successful businessmen and women. They help support the Selma High school Ag programs by purchasing animals and plants from the student-run farm and nursery on campus.

"That's what we like to see is them grow up, be successful and then be contributing to the community of Selma," Swift said.


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