Meth psychosis defense used in Fresno man's murder case

Daniel Galvan has admitted to officers he shot his wife five to six times. But, his attorneys have claimed he did this during a drug induced psychosis.
November 12, 2013 12:00:00 AM PST
Daniel Galvan has admitted to officers he shot his wife five to six times. But, his attorneys have claimed he did this during a drug induced psychosis.

An expert said years of usage combined with a high use that day, caused Galvan to be unable to make good judgments or be aware of his actions.

Dr. Alex Yufik is a licensed attorney with a doctorate in clinical psychology. He has also studied meth extensively and its effects on the brain and behavior.

Tuesday he told jurors when you abuse meth you are nine times more likely to be involved in a homicide. Dr. Yufik also said Daniel Galvan had used so much meth, he was unable to plan out a murder.

"The large level of methamphetamine used, coupled with the psychotic features, prevents the person from planning, organizing and judgment in that particular case," said Dr. Yufik. "It does not prevent a person from carrying out activities. For example, he could still go to the restroom and brush his teeth and he would know what a toothbrush was."

Prosecutor Jeff Dupras alleged Galvan went through specific processes that were thought out. From trying to arrange for his niece to take his children away from the home to retrieving a gun from a bag in a closet to actually loading the weapon. Step by step Dupras had the expert witness describe the details involved in preparing a gun to shoot.

Dupras explained, "You have to insert it into the chamber. How do bullets get in that magazine? You have to place the bullets inside the magazine. On top, one at a time, correct? Correct."

The expert witness also told jurors he watched the two hour taped interview of investigators questioning Galvan after the murder.

Homicide Detective Ignacio Ruiz testifed last week the suspect was faking like he was falling asleep because he didn't want to be interrogated. But, Yufik said he believed Galvan was, in fact dozing off, because he was crashing and coming off his high.

Prosecutors believe Galvan killed his wife because she intended to leave him and take their boys.

Defense attorneys say drug abuse has been an issue in Galvan's life since he was a teen. The expert witness says only a high user could tolerate the amount of meth he had in his system the evening of the homicide.


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