Several Valley organizations set to begin large-scale Typhoon Haiyan donations

Several organizations and churches across the Valley are working to send non-perishable food and supplies to the typhoon victims.
November 17, 2013 12:00:00 AM PST
The death toll from Typhoon Haiyan now stands at nearly 4,000, with an estimated 1,200 still missing. Several organizations and churches across the Valley are working to send non-perishable food and supplies to the typhoon victims.

Organizers of the collection efforts said that people have been very generous when giving money and supplies. While one major donation drive wrapped up over the weekend another group set to begin a large-scale donation effort Monday.

Typhoon Haiyan came and went leaving behind miles and miles of devastation. That has inspired donation organizer Guy Graham to start a local relief effort. Graham is working with Gleanings for the Hungry, a Christian non-profit in Dinuba, to send supplies to the victims of Hainan.

"The situation over there is really bad and we need to start collecting now," Graham said. "Anything from rice and beans to bandages to toilet paper to plastic gloves, anything they're going to need."

Several churches, including Sunnyside Baptist church, have volunteered to be drop-off locations for donations. Pastor David Powell says his church is more than willing to help Filipinos who've lost it all.

"Based on what we've seen they just absolutely need everything, they have nothing and they're fighting for survival," Powell said.

As one donation drive is set to start another successfully ended.

Clothes, electronics and toys lined a driveway and front yard of an East Central Fresno home Sunday. Noelani Perez-Kitongan and her friend Angelica Buensuceso spent the weekend holding a yard sale. All profits and donations will be sent to help those devastated by Typhoon Haiyan.

"We can't just sit and watch TV and look at what's happening out there, so we're doing our own very small help," Perez-Kitongan said.

The yard sale has made close to $3,500 in sales and donations over the weekend. The fundraising effort was personal for the Filipino women who have families in and near Tacloban, the area hit hardest by Haiyan. Through social media, the women know their families are okay, but continue to struggle.

"They had to go to near the satellite to get at least a five minute signal to spread the word that they're safe, posted immediately in Facebook that they're safe," Buensuceso said.

"Those streets that you see where the dead bodies are, I walked those streets, and the churches I went to those churches so it's a very personal thing for me," Perez-Kitongan said.

On a larger scale nearly 20 Filipino groups in the Valley are coming together to collect money and supplies to send to the Philippines.

Russell Raypon led a donation drive over the weekend. He says they have collected close to $1,700 and nearly a hundred boxes of much needed supplies.

"The blankets and the jackets and the socks, the shoes and the toiletry will address some of the hygiene issues that are taking place and much needed and welcome by the people suffering a great deal there," Russell Raypon, P.O.W.E.R 2.0 said.

The boxes will be shipped to the Philippine Red Cross by the end of the week. But logistically organizers say that it may take a month for the supplies to get there.

Donation information for Typhoon Haiyan victims


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