Valley teens on a spring break job hunt

Hundreds of high school teens and young adults took time out of their spring break to go on the job hunt.
April 16, 2014 12:00:00 AM PDT
Hundreds of high school teens and young adults took time out of their spring break to go on the job hunt.

David Euresti was one of thousands of teens and young adults looking for a summer job at the mayor's youth job fair. Finding a job in past summers has been a difficult task, but this year he is well prepared.

Euresti said, "I made sure I had all my resumes up to date and made sure I made myself look nice and sharp and basically practice my people skills."

More than 50 employers attended Wednesday's job fair. Opportunities range from part-time work to full time jobs. For those who land a job they can expect a bump in pay over last summer. Minimum wage increases go into effect in July. But organizers say work experience is more than just a paycheck.

Event Chairman Doug Betts explained, "For a lot of these young people they come through here and they find businesses and types of jobs that they never thought of. They can find a new career path just by having a conversation with one of the employers here."

If you already graduated high school and you are looking to start a career the department of corrections is looking to hire seven thousand people within the next three years.

Correctional Sergant Jeremy Collier says the application process can take six to ten months, but you are compensated during your time in the academy.

Sergant Collier said, "There's plenty of room for promotion within the department correctional sergeant, correctional lieutenant, background investigator, councilors, and so on and so forth."

For now Euresti is just looking for a summer job that can help him handle the expenses of a recent purchase.

Euresti said, "I just got myself a car so I need to pay for that."


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