Leap for the rest at Clovis North High School

Thousands of Clovis North students gave their all to break a world record with the largest game of leap frog.
May 1, 2014 12:00:00 AM PDT
Thousands of Clovis North students gave their all to break a world record with the largest game of leap frog.

In a massive feat to beat a world record, hundreds of Clovis North students took to the field for a game of leap frog.

Clovis North student Andrew Matteucci said, "We needed to do a project for class and we thought why not break a world record and give back to the community."

Andrew Matteucci and Trenton Kammerer are freshman, and the brains behind the leaping attempt. And they're following in their teacher's footsteps.

Clovis North teacher Mary Allen said, "In 1990, we broke the Guinness book of world records for the world's largest box of popcorn. So when the two boys came to me and said Mrs. Allen lets break a world record. Will you be our advisor? I said sure, they'll never make it and they got approved."

This leaping action at Clovis North is just one of the many attempts during the past few years. In fact, many students try to make history and put the Valley on the map.

Fresno State marketing students just donated their record attempt, 12,500 pairs of shoes for the longest chain of shoes. And a giant cup outside Professor Bill Rice's home has held the world's largest cup of lemonade and cereal.

"I think we probably had 20 different world records at springtime about five years ago," said Dr. Rice. "It happens when people get excited about learning, let's get students involved this is exciting, let's do this stuff."

1700 students at Clovis North were excited and ready to beat the previous record set by New Zealand Elementary School students by leap frogging more than nine minutes and 1,300 times.

"Oh it's very exciting," said Kammerer. "It's probably one of the coolest things I've ever done at this school."

After minutes and waves of leap frogging, these students can now say they're a part of the Guinness Book World of Records.

In addition to the record attempt, the students donated $2,014.14 to the Wounded Warriors Project.


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