Correcting Lasik Damage: Gift of Sight

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There is a non-invasive solution that is restoring eyesight without surgery. (KFSN)

About 600,000 people a year get Lasik surgery hoping to chuck their glasses or contacts. But according to consumer reports, about half of them will still need to wear glasses or have more surgery over time. Now, there is a non-invasive solution that is restoring eyesight without surgery.

The world is back in focus for 40-year-old Shannon Cheek. Her son is crystal clear, as is her computer screen; a big relief after Lasik complications and multiple surgeries.

Cheek told Ivanhoe, "I couldn't get over how clear he looked. It was kind of like going from an old tube television to HD TV. Before, people would always ask me what's wrong with your eye, because it was like drooping and closed."

The difference-maker: a large, customized contact lens that covers the entire cornea. It uses tears to smooth out scarring caused by refractive surgery.

Albert Pang, OD, Optometrist at Trinity Eye Care in Plano, Texas told Ivanhoe, "We are talking about a life-changing experience. Imagine if you are living in a world that's like looking through a bowl of water or a fish bowl that is always distorted. And, for the first time, you'll be able to see stable, clear vision, kind of like the gift of sight coming back to you again."

Despite those multiple surgeries after Lasik, Shannon's vision was still blurry, especially at night. But her new scleral lenses changed all that.

"So, this is a breakthrough concept in a way that we are no longer using contact lenses to replace just the glasses. We are using contact lenses to improve your eyesight," Dr. Pang explained.

Cheek exclaimed, "I am unbelievably grateful for Dr. Pang and just the care that he gave me and that he was able to help me."

Now, the apple of Shannon's eye is in perfect focus.

Many patients say the larger scleral lenses are more comfortable than traditional contacts. Dr. Pang says they also can help people with dry eye syndrome.

For more information, contact:

Aileen Pang

Related Topics:
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