Clovis students organize mental health awareness campaign amid rise of youth suicide

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A dozen suicides at Valley schools this past year left many students, parents, teachers and administrators in shock. (KFSN)

A dozen suicides at Valley schools this past year left many students, parents, teachers and administrators in shock.

A group of Clovis High students organized Mental Health Awareness Week on campus. Their goal is to let troubled classmates know they are not alone and many people are willing to help them get through any tough situation.

The social pressures of high school can be overwhelming for many teenagers, but student leaders at Clovis High want their classmates to know help is always available.

"Letting kids know that it's okay to not be okay," Clovis High senior Maddie Murray said. "It's okay to ask for help and get help. It's really important, I think, in our lives."

This week, students are going class to class to talk to their peers about the available resources. Their shirts show it's time to break the stigma when comes to talking about mental health issues.

"We just want kids to know that it's okay to get help and it's not seen as a weakness," student Graham Hauss said. "It's a strength to admit that you need help."

Three students at Clovis West were among those who committed suicide. The incidents have touched all Valley schools.

"It hit home, but it didn't happen on our campus and so because of that we're able to, from somewhat of a distance, be able to use that resource to get awareness out to our kids and our community," Clovis High principal Denver Stairs said.

Teachers, coaches and even psychologists are available on many campuses.

"Kids don't necessarily like talking to adults, but I think it's important," Murray said. "Just to find someone that you're comfortable with."

Stairs calls it a relevant issue for all kids and it's important students and adults start the conversation. This week's presentations are broken down into topics like depression and anxiety and social media.

They're meant to spotlight help available in case students may need someone to talk to.
Related Topics:
societysuicidehigh schoolclovismental healthClovis
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