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Clovis Community Medical Center answering the call to conserve water

Just as new water restrictions go into effect in cities across the state, Clovis Community Medical Center is answering the call to conserve.
Thursday, July 31, 2014
Just as new water restrictions go into effect in cities across the state, Clovis Community Medical Center is answering the call to conserve. The project will be the city's first and largest private user of recycled water.

"We've had a lot of designers and people involved in this making sure we do something really wonderful," said Clovis Community Medical Center Director of facilities John Hall.

In the last few weeks, crews at the hospital began installing the first of 50 miles of purple pipes and are now connecting them to the city's main line that runs along Temperance Avenue.

"It's exciting to be part of a system like this that's so proactive," said Hall.

The new, designated infrastructure will be built in five phases -- and will be used to carry millions of gallons of treated wastewater to the hospital -- for landscaping.

"When it's all completed, because of the size of this campus, we're expanding our landscaping now because of the availability of recycled water. So when it's all said and done it will be approaching about 30-40 million gallons a year we'll be using," added Hall.

As part of its mission to conserve water in the ongoing drought, the hospital is also planting drought-tolerant trees, bushes and shrubs.

The new landscape will also feature open spaces with walking paths and benches for patients, staff members and visitors to enjoy.

A park-like setting removing the demand for potable water on the city's system --- by using recycled water instead.

"I think one; it shows it can be used safely and the hospital is being a good steward of our resources," said Assistant Public Utilities Director for the city of Clovis, Lisa Koehn.

The large lawn areas in front of the hospital were also replaced by a more drought resistant variety. Hall said Bermuda grass uses about 50% less water and will also be irrigated using recycled water from the purple pipes.

The project is expected to be complete in October.



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