AM Live Ag Report

FRESNO, Calif.

The state senate approved the measure Monday night with the minimum number of votes. But it took several tries to get the bill through the assembly, where a two-thirds majority is needed.

Supporters of the delay include Modesto State Senator Dave Cogdill. They argued voters would likely vote down the measure this fall because of California's budget trouble.

Critics said the bond was too expensive, and wanted to keep it on the ballot to see it fail. The measures to delay the water bond now go to Governor Schwarzenegger for his signature.

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Tuesday morning, the Valley agriculture industry is mourning the loss of a produce pioneer.

Tuesday family and friends begin their final goodbye to Jack Pandol. He died last Wednesday in his sleep. The Orosi native was 87-years-old.

In the 1960's, Pandol sent the first refrigerated trucks cross-country to deliver produce, bypassing railroads.

Tuesday there will be a viewing from 4 to 8 p.m. at Delano Mortuary. A funeral mass is scheduled for 10 a.m. Wednesday at St. Francis Church in Bakersfield, followed by a reception at Stockdale Country Club.

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Experts say the United States, Argentina and Australia will gain the most from the recent spike in wheat prices.

Russia banned grain exports for the rest of the year after a severe drought and wildfires destroyed 20-percent of its wheat crop.

The price of wheat has jumped more than 70-percent on world markets this summer. The higher wheat price may mean that Americans and Europeans pay slightly more for bread. But analysts say the bigger burden will fall on people in the Middle East, Africa and parts of Asia, a because commodity prices make up a larger part of their food bills.

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There's a new trend in the locally grown food movement.

Spas are starting to put produce from nearby family farms on their menus. They're incorporating the fruits and herbs in skin treatments and massage therapies.

Southern California's Ojai Valley Inn offers a $145 treatment that uses halves of tangerines from a nearby farm as applicators for a sugar-based exfoliant.

A treatment at spa hotel Healdsburg in Northern California features a salve of wine and honey from a local vineyard.

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