Satellite images show California's shrinking Shasta Lake reservoir amid drought

On Monday, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation said the lake is currently only filled to about 35% capacity.
Climate and water experts are growing increasingly worried by California's shrinking reservoirs.

Pictures from NASA show the extent of the recent drought. The satellite images compare Shasta Lake in Northern California from July 2019 to June of this year.

Shasta Lake is the largest reservoir in the state.

On Monday, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation said the lake is currently only filled to about 35% capacity.

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The drought conditions have continued to worsen.

Gov. Gavin Newsom recently asked Californians to voluntarily cut back on water consumption by 15% as drought conditions continue to worsen.

California Fish and Wildlife officials also released guidance for fishing during dry conditions.

The department is asking recreational anglers to voluntarily change how, when and where they fish to minimize the stress and mortality among fish populations.

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They are asking anglers not to fish past noon on certain inland waters.

Elevated water temperatures, lower oxygen levels, disease, low flows and low water levels are among the drought-related effects impacting many of the state's waters and fisheries, officials said.

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