A growing number of Americans choose to work from home

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A recent study published in The Journal, New Technology found a cultural shift in which the idea of 'work' is detached from the idea of a work 'place.' (KFSN)

Kristin Harrington works hard as a full-time employee and a full-time mom and she does it all from home.

"I can flex my own hours. And as long as I'm able to get my work done then everything is fine," Harrington said.

Maura Thomas, author of Work Without Walls says it is easy to see why telecommuting is exploding in popularity.

"No commute. You save all that time and all that frustration. Wardrobe expenses, car expenses. Fewer sick days because you're not exposed to airborne illnesses," said Thomas.

A recent study published in The Journal, New Technology found a cultural shift in which the idea of 'work' is detached from the idea of a work 'place.'

But while the study found this has significantly higher levels of job satisfaction, it can also come with a cost: the inability to clock out when the workday is done. Research also found 39 percent of remote workers routinely work extra time compared to only 24 percent of office workers.

Thomas said, "There's a barrage all day long of E-mail and voice mail and an instant message and text messages. It's difficult to just turn that off."

But Maura says turning off is key for long-term success. Allowing time for things like exercise, sleep, and family.

Kristin says she works hard but always makes time for her her loved ones by clocking out at five.

"I have the best of both worlds. I get to be a mom, and I get to generate that full-time income," Harrington said.

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