Golden One Credit Union to replace bank cards after Target security breach

In the midst of the holiday shopping season banks are still trying to recover from a massive security breach at Target stores.
December 26, 2013 12:00:00 AM PST
In the midst of the holiday shopping season banks are still trying to recover from a massive security breach at Target stores. As many as 40 million shoppers are still at risk after thieves hacked into the chain's payment system.

Sacramento based Golden One Credit Union said of those millions of affected Target security breach, 67,000 bank at the credit union.

The issue is still concerning to Golden One Credit Union members. Robert Hernandez tells Action News that he is still trying to determine whether he shopped at Target during the breach, and if he should be worried about whether he's one of the customers whose bank information was compromised.

"Now it's kind of scary because I don't remember if it was purchase card or with cash," Hernandez said.

If you shopped at any Target between November 27 and Dec. 15 you could be at risk. Target is still investigating how it happened, but Golden One Credit Union has identified who is at risk and took it a step further by mailing new cards to 67,000 potential victims.

"We have not seen fraudulent transactions on these accounts but we're taking the proactive approach that the best way to prevent that is to simply replace the cards," said Scott Ingram, Vice President of Public Relations for Golden One.

The Credit Union has 650,000 members and says the people at risk are those with cards who made purchases during the time frame that Target has identified. Target said that pin numbers were not compromised.

"Things like social security number and other personal identifying factors are not on those cards- so that eliminates risk of identity theft," Ingram said.

Long time Credit Union customer William Scott says he's concerned about the breach, and now relieved that his bank is staying ahead of the thieves.

"It's a wise thing- they've always done right by everybody you know," Scott said.

The Credit Union also suggests signing up for online banking and mobile alerts so you can constantly monitor your account. Most other institutions have posted information about the breach on their websites.


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