McCarthy falls short in votes again, House adjourns without speaker for second day

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Thursday, January 5, 2023
McCarthy falls short in votes again, House adjourns without speaker for second day
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For a second day in a row, Valley Congressman Kevin McCarthy came up short in his attempt to become Speaker of the House.

For a second day in a row, Valley Congressman Kevin McCarthy came up short in his attempt to become Speaker of the House.

Day two of voting for a House speaker picked up where it left off, with disagreement and divisiveness.

Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy failed to get the support of at least 20 GOP members 6 times in a row.

Political analyst Mark Keppler says McCarthy is in a tough situation with members of his own party refusing to support him.

"They don't care who gets the position as long as it is not McCarthy. Whoever gets it, is going to be incredibly weak," explained Mark Keppler, executive director of the Maddy Institute. "The fallback is that they can't get McCarthy out, but he is going to be such a weakened speaker, they are going to control the house."

A speaker must be selected before the new Congress can be sworn in and get to work on issues impacting their districts.

RELATED: House adjourns until Thursday after McCarthy rejected for speaker again

"In my district, we have one hospital closure that just happened today. We have to get water on the farms. We have to drill American oil and get gas prices down," said 13th Congressional District Rep. John Duarte.

Republican John Duarte was elected to represent the 13th Congressional District in the Central Valley. He can't be officially sworn in until the speaker is selected. Duarte says although the process is taking longer than expected, he believes McCarthy will come out on top.

"If some folks can't get along with Kevin well enough, they need to appreciate how hard he's worked to get this majority together and then to get Americans set. He has laid out what we need to do," Duarte said.

South Valley Republican David Valadao of Hanford posted a video on Twitter, breaking down what is happening among the GOP and those not siding with McCarthy.

"The talk of wanting the debate, and wanting to know and to talk about what the issues are is something we have always been open to and in the conference over the last few weeks," Valadao said. "We've had some debates and can't get a direct answer as to what they actually want."

Keppler says what is happening shows the country where the GOP stands while Democrats sit back confidently voting for Hakeem Jeffries each voting round.

Rules to elect the Speaker of the House could be changed with a majority vote, allowing a speaker to be elected with a plurality.

It's known as the nuclear option, forcing Republicans not in favor of McCarthy to either vote for him, or let Hakeem Jeffries get elected since he is getting the most votes every round.