Local farmers headed to State Capitol to hold water rally

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Local growers from the South Valley are on an important trip to the State's Capital.

Local growers from the South Valley are on an important trip to the State's Capital. Farmers are headed to Sacramento to rally against what they call a "water grab".

Farm Bureau officials say the proposal will double the amount of water taken from the Tuolumne, Stanislaus, and Merced Rivers-- diverting it to the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to restore fish populations.

However, irrigation districts and cities say the plan will cause devastating effects on agriculture and the economy in the northern San Joaquin Valley.

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Local growers from the South Valley are on an important trip to the State's Capital.



Assemblyman Adam Gray of Merced is the Chief Organizer and is expected to speak at the Capitol building.

Hundreds of Valley farmers, including our own Future Farmers of America Students convened on the steps of the state capitol to make their voices heard.

The Stop the Water Grab Rally did not miss a beat, especially with Atwater High school's band carrying the tune.
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Local growers from the South Valley are preparing for an important trip to the State's Capital.



For several hours, local representatives voiced their concern over the State water board's proposal to divert water from the Tuolumne, Stanislaus, and Merced Rivers to restore the salmon populations.

"You can't increase salmon runs with just water you have to do habitat restoration you have to rebuild riverbeds you have to deal with non-native species like bass in these rivers and the water boards plan isn't to deal with these issues its just to take the water," said Adam Gray.
Of those invited to speak and sit in on a roundtable with local representatives was Planada Elementary School District Superintendent Jose Gonzalez.

'It was a powerful panel talking about how the impacts that this policy would have on the tri-county area," said Planada Superintendent Jose Gonzalez.

He says two schools in his district still rely on domestic wells but he represented the 57,000 students in the 115 schools in Merced County.

"There are approximately 10 other districts within our county that are rural unincorporated that are depended on domestic wells. Those are dependent on surface water recharge in order to be operational," said Gonzalez.

He says they want the water board to include mitigation measures and fully analyze the groundwater impacts.

"In this time of contentious dialogue between red and blue democrats and republicans this is a partisan issue," said Gonzalez.
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politicscalifornia waterwatercalifornia
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