North Fork residents dig out from several feet of snow

Kate Nemarich Image
Friday, March 3, 2023
North Fork residents dig out from several feet of snow
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People living on Cascadel Heights in North Fork say initially the snowfall was peaceful, but as more snow fell and the power went down last Friday, that novelty wore off.

NORTH FORK, Calif. (KFSN) -- People living on Cascadel Heights in North Fork say initially, the snowfall was peaceful, but as more snow fell and the power went down last Friday, that novelty wore off.

"This is hard at this point, said Kris Hamilton, North Fork Resident. "It's really tiring."

Power was restored for some people on the street by Wednesday, but they worry about how long that will last.

"We could have a health catastrophe at any moment right now, and with the road clear, maybe we could get medical services up here, but they've still got to get up four feet of snow up long driveways," said Hamilton.

For people living up there, they've provided a lot of neighborly support, even doing some of the heavy lifting themselves.

"I have a small tractor, so I was able to help get out of our driveway and help around a little bit," said Steve Thorns, a North Fork resident.

"The neighbors have pulled together, we've been pooling food resources and if you can get to my house, people have been coming to my house and we have dinner and try to make the best of this," said Hamilton.

Hamilton said the county came through to plow on Wednesday, but they will continue to dig out driveways. The neighbors have more concern for their elderly neighbors and others in the county with fewer resources.

Former U.S. Representative Rick Lehman is one of those without power. He hopes solutions come from the lessons learned in this storm.

"I think going forward, there's got to be a very serious look at this on a countywide basis because this probably won't be the last time this happens," said Lehman.

Meanwhile, the Western Propane Gas Association is shifting its focus to make sure those who need propane most get it.

"That means prioritizing families, single-family residences, apartment complexes, and also making sure that emergency services and first responders have access to plenty of fuel as well," said Colin Sueyres, WPGA President.

Sueyres said they work alongside local companies and state agencies to coordinate safe deliveries.

He said to be aware that generators do use a lot more propane than people realize, so stay aware of levels and don't wait until you are down below 30% to call for a refuel.

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