Keeping cool in the heat

April 29, 2013 12:00:00 AM PDT
It's spring, but it doesn't feel like it. Temperatures are expected to be in the high 90s for most of the week. And if you aren't careful, it could be dangerous to your health.

Monday morning, the temperature hovered around 70 degrees in a Fresno County orchard. But those in the Ag industry know the cool temps these workers are enjoying will soon change.

Ryan Jacobsen said, "It's not just starting to warm up, it's hot. What our farmers and ranchers are doing obviously is making sure every protocol in place to make sure their employees and themselves stay safe."

In addition to water and shade, Ryan Jacobsen with the farm bureau says many farmers will change work hours to avoid the intense heat. But the rising temperatures also affects others who work or play outside.

Dr. William Ebbeling said, "You have to look at your environment and say am I going to be in something that's putting heat into my body rather than taking it out."

Dr. Ebbeling says these warmer temperatures will be uncomfortable for people. He recommends people try to keep cool and constantly hydrate.

"Not to overproduce heat, not to get your body to heat that leads to heat stroke and exhaustion," said Dr. Ebbeling.

While the Ag industry is seeing the warm temperatures earlier, they're hoping this quick adjustment period doesn't impact workers and crops.

"Plants and animals are a whole lot like humans," said Jacobsen. "They take an adjustment period when you get those extremes where you go from relatively decent weather to warm weather overnight, it does stress them out."

And with temperatures here at the end of April and beginning of May, it looks like we could have one long hot summer ahead of us.


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