Local leaders answer Creek Fire recovery questions at community meeting

A priority for the county is removing toxic debris before winter weather comes along.
SIERRA HIGH SCHOOL, Calif. (KFSN) -- Hundreds of thousands of acres burned.

Over 1,000 structures damaged or destroyed.

And the Creek Fire hasn't been fully contained yet.

Fresno County Fire says crews could be putting hot spots out for months.

Those who were hit the hardest by the largest single wildfire in the state's history are beginning to recover.

On Thursday night, county leaders and officials came before community members face to face at Sierra High School to explain what steps are next in recovering and rebuilding.

A priority for the county is removing toxic debris before winter weather comes along.

"We need state support and federal support to come in and do the hazardous waste removal from properties and to get the ash off the properties," said Director of Public Health David Pomaville.

A concern brought to light at this meeting was tree removal.

PG&E says they will dispose of small trees that they cut down from properties but bigger trees that they cut down will be the responsibility of homeowners to remove.

Supervisor Nathan Magsig says those concerns were heard.

"There's more work to be done is one of the things that we learned, so we are going to continue to work with the utility companies," said Magsig.

Tim Elming has called the mountains home for 60 years. He lost two houses and his business to the Creek Fire but is hopeful for the future of his community.

"I want to clean up my property. I want to start building. I want to get temporary power in. I want to put a trailer on my property so I can still enjoy it," he said.
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