Valley students learn about nutrition and agriculture

March 23, 2013 12:42:25 AM PDT
We've all heard the saying "you are what you eat," but today hundreds of Valley students got a first-hand look at what that actually means.

Students learned more about their food, fiber and animal production. It's a one-day interactive educational experience sponsored by the Fresno County Farm Bureau.

Makayla Andrews, student said, "It was cool and I learned how dogs get sheep's attention. And how is that? They chase them around and then woof woof. It was so funny."

More than 1,6oo third graders and their teachers gathered at the Fresno Fairgrounds for the 8th annual Farm and Nutrition Day, Friday.

That's where they took part in 45 different demonstrations including sheep-herding, cow-milking and growing a garden.

Shelby Macnab, Cal-Fresh Manager said, "We have a really high obesity rate here in Fresno County so the work that we do today is really important to educate families about healthy eating and making healthy choices."

The purpose is for students to learn more about the abundant agricultural industry in Fresno County, potential career opportunities and how there food is produced.

David Hollister, student chaperone said, "A lot of kids don't necessarily know where they're food comes from. They know it on their plate, but don't know how it got there. Is that something you see? When we go for rides in the country I tell my niece, you know that plant right there, that's artichoke fields and its good for them to learn that I think, you know?"

One of the main attractions is the tasting room, where kids meet one-on-one with the farmers who make their food right here in the Valley. An event where students don't walk-away empty handed. In addition to the peach popsicles, fruit cups and others healthy snacks these students took away an important life lesson.

The food they put into their body affects how they function.

Some of the students said they were stunned to learn Fresno County is number one in the nation for agriculture. In 2011, it produced more than 400 commercial crops totaling more than $7 billion dollars in gross production.


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